Also in the News: Airport scans raise privacy issues

Despite assurances from Transportation Security Administration officials that scans made of airline passengers during the security screening process are kept confidential and are quickly disposed of, some privacy advocates are questioning the practice, the Boston Globe reports.

TSA said extra safeguards were put in place when it tested whole-body scanners at Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport, but "most passengers would be horrified" by the perceived invasion of privacy if they could see the results of the scans, an American Civil Liberties Union spokesman said, according to the Globe. The paper also reported that health experts are concerned about the amount of radiation that certain machines emit. It  quotes one official from Columbia University Medical Center who said the scans should not be routinely used on children, pregnant women or people whose genes make them especially susceptible to radiation.

Featured

  • Telecommunications
    Stock photo ID: 658810513 By asharkyu

    GSA extends EIS deadline to 2023

    Agencies are getting up to three more years on existing telecom contracts before having to shift to the $50 billion Enterprise Infrastructure Solutions vehicle.

  • Workforce
    Shutterstock image ID: 569172169 By Zenzen

    OMB looks to retrain feds to fill cyber needs

    The federal government is taking steps to fill high-demand, skills-gap positions in tech by retraining employees already working within agencies without a cyber or IT background.

  • Acquisition
    GSA Headquarters (Photo by Rena Schild/Shutterstock)

    GSA to consolidate multiple award schedules

    The General Services Administration plans to consolidate dozens of its buying schedules across product areas including IT and services to reduce duplication.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.