DHS awards $11.7 million for cyber research

The Homeland Security Department today awarded $11.7 million in grants for cybersecurity research to 13 recipients from industry and academia.

The department’s Science and Technology Directorate made some awards to focus research and development on botnets and malware, composable and scalable secure systems, cybersecurity metrics and  data anonymization tools. Other awards will be used for research on insider threat detection and mitigation, Internet tomography and topography; network data visualization for information assurance; process control system security and routing security management tools, DHS said.

Some recipients are Applied Visions, Inc. of Northport, N.Y.; Computer Associates Inc. of Islandia, N..Y.; Colorado State University and Digital Bond Inc. of Fort Lauderdale, Fla. The others are Georgia Tech Research Corp.; IBM Corp.; ITT/Dolphin Technology; Johns Hopkins University; Packet Clearing House Inc.;  Sandia National Laboratories; Secure64 Software Corp. of Greenwood Village, Colo.; the University of California-San Diego and Washington State University.

“The work conducted by these awardees will drive the technologies and best practices needed to strengthen our nation’s cybersecurity,” Douglas Maughan, cybersecurity research program manager of the directorate’s Command, Control and Interoperability Division, said in a news release.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

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