DHS' trusted-traveler program expands

About 1,100 people have enrolled in the Homeland Security Department’s Global Entry trusted-traveler program since it began at three airports in June, department officials have said.

The program will expand to four more airports this fall, according to an Aug. 12 news release from Customs and Border Protection. Those airports are Los Angeles International, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International, Chicago O’Hare International, and Miami International.

The pilot project was conducted at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston, John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York and Washington Dulles International Airport.

Only U.S. citizens and permanent residents are eligible to participate in Global Entry. Applicants provide biographic and biometric information, undergo a background check, and complete an interview with a CBP officer. Once accepted, travelers may use a special kiosk at the airports when returning to the United States from abroad rather than waiting in line for customs processing.

At the kiosks, participants must present their machine-readable passport or permanent residency cards to be read electronically, submit fingerprints for biometric verification, and make customs declarations. The travelers are photographed and given a transaction receipt that must be presented to a CBP officer. Travelers pay $100 to enroll in the program for five years.

To date, about 370 participants have used the airport kiosks, CBP officials said.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • FCW PERSPECTIVES
    sensor network (agsandrew/Shutterstock.com)

    Are agencies really ready for EIS?

    The telecom contract has the potential to reinvent IT infrastructure, but finding the bandwidth to take full advantage could prove difficult.

  • People
    Dave Powner, GAO

    Dave Powner audits the state of federal IT

    The GAO director of information technology issues is leaving government after 16 years. On his way out the door, Dave Powner details how far govtech has come in the past two decades and flags the most critical issues he sees facing federal IT leaders.

  • FCW Illustration.  Original Images: Shutterstock, Airbnb

    Should federal contracting be more like Airbnb?

    Steve Kelman believes a lighter touch and a bit more trust could transform today's compliance culture.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.