Science.gov launches a new version

A new version of Science.gov — a free, single-search gateway for science and technology information from 17 organizations in 13 federal science agencies — was launched recently.

Science.gov 5.0 lets users to search additional collections of science resources. It also makes it easier to target searches and find links to information on a variety of science topics. The Energy Department hosts the site that was announced Sept. 15.

The new version of the Web gateway has seven new databases and portals which allow researchers access to more than 200 million pages of scientific information. New information available includes thousands of patents from Energy Department research and development, documents and bibliographic citations of DOE accomplishments, the department said.

Science.gov 5.0 also has a clustering tool which helps target searches by grouping results, by subtopics or dates.The new version of the Web site also provides links to related EurekAlert! Science News and Wikipedia, and provides the capability to download research results into personal files or citation software.

Science.gov is hosted by DOE’s Office of Scientific and Technical Information in DOE’s Office of Science. It is supported by contributing members of the Science.gov Alliance that include the Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Health and Human Services, and Interior departments, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Government Printing Office, the Library of Congress, NASA and the National Science Foundation.

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

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