DOD finalizes personnel system rules

Although some changes were made to a Defense Department personnel system, its primary features are intact, DOD and Office of Personnel Management officials said today.

The agencies issued the final regulations for the National Security Personnel System (NSPS), which was amended by the 2008 National Defense Authorization Act.

There are currently approximately 183,000 DOD employees under NSPS, a human resources management system. Additional conversions of DOD personnel into the system — in late 2008 and early 2009 — will bring the total number of employees to about 200,000.

The final regulations govern how employees are classified, compensated and reviewed.

The National Security Personnel System retains the existing features of the civil service, including a merit system and veterans’ preference. It also allows employees to be paid and rewarded based on performance and market considerations, officials said.

Under the 2008 National Defense Authorization Act, the system must follow existing governmentwide rules for labor/management relations, and disciplinary actions against employees. The act also governs employees' right to appeal actions taken against them. It excludes blue-collar employees from being covered under the system.

The changes allow for employees appointed for less than 90 days to be covered by the system, the agencies said.

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • Workforce
    Shutterstock image 1658927440 By Deliris masks in office coronavirus covid19

    White House orders federal contractors vaccinated by Dec. 8

    New COVID-19 guidance directs federal contractors and subcontractors to make sure their employees are vaccinated — the latest in a series of new vaccine requirements the White House has been rolling out in recent weeks.

  • FCW Perspectives
    remote workers (elenabsl/Shutterstock.com)

    Post-pandemic IT leadership

    The rush to maximum telework did more than showcase the importance of IT -- it also forced them to rethink their own operations.

Stay Connected