Fiscal 2009 IT budgets overview

On Sept. 24, the House passed legislation to fund the Homeland Security, Veterans Affairs and Defense departments for fiscal 2009, which looked poised to make its way through the Senate and become law.

According to the fiscal 2009 budgets in the legislation, VA would get a total of $47.6 billion in discretionary funding, DOD would get $487.7 billion in discretionary money, and $40 billion would go to DHS for discretionary spending. In lieu of other appropriations bills being passed, the legislation also would keep the rest of government funded at fiscal 2008 levels until early March.

In sum, the measure would provide billions of dollars for IT-related projects across the government and fiscal 2009 IT projects  at DHS, VA and DOD. Some IT-related highlights from the DHS, VA and DOD budget portions include:


  • $272 million for DHS’ chief information officer office and departmentwide technology projects.

  • $313.5 million for DHS’ National Cyber Security Division; including $254.9 million for DHS’ share in the Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative (CNCI).

  • $2.5 billion total for VA IT.

  • $48 million for VA’s Financial and Logistics Integrated Technology Enterprise program, the department’s modernized financial and accounting system.

  • $750 million in additional DOD money for high-priority intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance activities.

About the Author

Ben Bain is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • FCW PERSPECTIVES
    sensor network (agsandrew/Shutterstock.com)

    Are agencies really ready for EIS?

    The telecom contract has the potential to reinvent IT infrastructure, but finding the bandwidth to take full advantage could prove difficult.

  • People
    Dave Powner, GAO

    Dave Powner audits the state of federal IT

    The GAO director of information technology issues is leaving government after 16 years. On his way out the door, Dave Powner details how far govtech has come in the past two decades and flags the most critical issues he sees facing federal IT leaders.

  • FCW Illustration.  Original Images: Shutterstock, Airbnb

    Should federal contracting be more like Airbnb?

    Steve Kelman believes a lighter touch and a bit more trust could transform today's compliance culture.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.