Authorization bill would require NASA to upgrade IT

NASA would be required to develop technology to allow the public to experience missions to the moon and Mars under a $20.2 billion reauthorization bill passed by the Senate.

The bill passed Sept. 25 by the Senate includes language from the House Science Science and Technology Committee that would require NASA officials to deliver a multimedia experience to the public, including high-definition video, 3-D images, and scientific data delivered over a high-bandwidth network.

The bill also calls for a review of the security systems that protect NASA’s information technology systems and data. The review would look at the ability of NASA’s network to limit, detect and monitor access to resources and information. It would also examine physical access to network resources.

Also, NASA would have to consult with other federal agencies to develop a framework for promoting worldwide safe access to space. The bill aims to ensure that entering, returning from and working in space is free from physical or radio frequency interference.

NASA must also develop a program to help promote the competitiveness of small, minority-owned and women-owned businesses. The space agency would join partnerships with industry, academia, government agencies and national laboratories.


 

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

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