Bush signs bill to fund government

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The bill

President Bush signed a continuing resolution on Sept. 30 to fund the government through March.

Bush said he is disappointed that Congress passed legislation to fund agencies at fiscal 2008 levels instead of appropriations bills for individual departments and agencies.

“There is much work to be done, and the Congress should not adjourn for the year without finishing important business on spending, taxes, and free trade agreements,” he said.

The fiscal 2009 Consolidated Security, Disaster Assistance and Continuing Appropriations Act (H.R. 2638) has five divisions and combines several appropriations bill.

It provides emergency supplemental appropriations through additional fiscal 2008 funding needed for relief and recovery from disasters, such as hurricanes and floods, and other supplemental appropriations.

The bill includes full-year fiscal 2009 appropriations for two departments. It gives the Defense Department $487.7 billion and gives the Homeland Security Department $40 billion. It also provides $72.9 billion for military construction and veterans affairs, according to the legislation.

The bill also includes fiscal 2009 appropriations to continue operations of the government through March 6 for projects and activities not otherwise covered in the two departments' full-year appropriations.

About the Author

Matthew Weigelt is a freelance journalist who writes about acquisition and procurement.

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