Companies show mix of competitive, noncompetitive contracts

As the federal officials are pushing for more full-and-open competition, individual contractors have a mixed record on competition, according to government data.

For example, 82 percent of Boeing’s contracts were noncompetitive in fiscal 2007. The figures about noncompetitive awards continue the same trend for other major government contractors, according to USASpending.gov.


  • 98 percent of United Technologies’ contracts.

  • 77 percent of Raytheon’s contracts.

  • 61 percent of Northrop Grumman’s contracts.


On the other hand, it’s not always so.n 75 percent of the contracts won by Lockheed Martin in fiscal 2007 were awarded through full-and-open competition. Similarly:


  • 77 percent of contracts won by BAE Systems.

  • 72 percent won by L-3.

  • 69 percent won by Computer Sciences Corp.

  • 63 percent won by IBM.

  • 60 percent won by Booz Allen Hamilton.


Those differences tend to be somewhat arbitrary, reflecting contractors’ specialization in certain contract types and subjects that fall into the competitive exceptions, such as some governmentwide acquisition contracts and indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity contracts, said Charles Tiefer, professor at the University of Baltimore School of Law.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

  • Comment
    Pilot Class. The author and Barbie Flowers are first row third and second from right, respectively.

    How VA is disrupting tech delivery

    A former Digital Service specialist at the Department of Veterans Affairs explains efforts to transition government from a legacy "project" approach to a more user-centered "product" method.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.