Bush signs NASA bill with tech requirements

NASA must add two space shuttle flights to the International Space Station and develop new technology to allow the public to participate in space travel under a bill signed Oct. 15 by President Bush.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Authorization Act of 2008 funds NASA in fiscal 2009. It also directs the agency to take all necessary steps to fly a third additional shuttle mission above the already planned missions.

Under the $20.2 billion law, NASA must also develop technology to allow the public to experience missions to the moon and Mars. NASA must deliver a multimedia experience to the public, including high-definition video, 3-D images, and scientific data delivered over a high-bandwidth network.


The law also calls for a review of the security systems that protect NASA’s information technology systems and data.


“The major provisions of this authorization bill affirm Congress’ support for the broad goals of the president’s space exploration policy, including the return of American astronauts to the moon, exploration of Mars and other destinations,” said NASA Administrator Michael Griffin.

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

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