Croom joins new Lockheed unit

Former DISA director Lt. General Charles Croom (retired) has joined a newly established unit of Lockheed Martin to lead the corporation’s cybersecurity strategy, the company announced today.


Croom, who retired in July as commander of the Joint Task Force for Global Network Operations and head of the Defense Information Systems Agency, will drive the company’s cybersecurity initiatives through a newly created unit called the Center for Cyber Security Innovation. Croom will have the title of vice president of cybersecurity solutions, the company said.


The company described the new cybersecurity center as an evolutionary step.


“This evolution does not change what we do in cyber security, but how we do it,” said Rick Johnson, chief technology officer of Lockheed Martin Information Systems & Global Services (IS&GS). “We intend to uniformly execute the delivery of our cyber security solutions across the company to benefit our customers long-term.”


Also playing a lead role at the new unit is former Senior Executive Service official Lee Holcomb, who was appointed vice president to lead the center and manage technology solution development, process excellence and talent development.


Holcomb was formerly chief technology officer for the Homeland Security Department and will be responsible for shaping technology initiatives and for strategic research and development.

About the Author

Wyatt Kash served as chief editor of GCN (October 2004 to August 2010) and also of Defense Systems (January 2009 to August 2010). He currently serves as Content Director and Editor at Large of 1105 Media.

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