Letter: Micromanagers too arrogant to learn better

Regarding "Are you a micromanager?"

Read the article, even though I am not a manager. I agree with everything that was suggested.

However, I worked with two micromanagers back to back and the problem is they are too arrogant to take lessons.

The first one was a great manager, yet he did what you said he should not do, which was put me down in front of people.

The next one is like the son of the first one. If you make a suggestion that he does not like, he retaliates. He changed my work hours and he tried to move my position to a foreign country. Even if your suggestions are excellent, you will not get through to them since they cannot see beyond their nose and are willing to destroy people’s careers, just like they have done to me.

The only way these people will learn from the article is to retire or be fired. But even if firing them, or should I say relieve them of supervisory duties, they will point fingers at other people [who are not at] fault.

I am so enthusiastic with my job, I am commenting on your article when I should be working.

Anonymous

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