DHS seeks training for acquisition workforce

he Homeland Security Department wants to immerse its workforce in acquisition regulations so it can understand the details of the rules when dealing with complex contracts, according to a solicitation released Nov. 6

“The courses are to prepare students to independently research the Federal Acquisition Regulation to find answers to complex questions and make informed contractual decisions,” the solicitation states.

Officials are seeking a company to enroll 25 people in its acquisition workforce into two intensive training sessions lasting five days each, the solicitation states. As the workforce becomes more familiar with the rules, DHS wants all students to have their own bound copy of the FAR, federal acquisition circulars, and a government contracts reference book.

“The training shall be a hands-on, active and intensive immersion in researching, interpreting and applying the FAR,” the solicitation states.

The department’s contracts are becoming more complicated and multifaceted, as DHS works to build its core infrastructure and adjust to newly merging technologies, a top DHS procurement officer recently said. DHS’ acquisition workforce needs a deep understanding acquisition regulations to find the near- and long-term solutions when contracting to meet those needs, the officer said.

DHS wants the training done between February and March. The deadline for proposals is Nov. 12.


[Editor's Update: DHS cancelled the solicitation on Nov. 12.]

About the Author

Matthew Weigelt is a freelance journalist who writes about acquisition and procurement.

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