DOD hopes to improve interoperability by limiting frequencies

In an effort to improve network interoperability, Defense Department officials will attempt to reduce the number of communication waveforms used in military equipment, according to a DOD instruction released Nov. 3.

The new policy creates procedures for the developing and modifying wireless communications waveforms. New and modified waveforms -- essentially, frequencies -- will undergo a review under the policy. 

While officials hope to reduce the number of waveforms used, they plan to do it without hindering technology advancements. DOD officials also do not want to impose an undue burden on the acquisition system.

Under the new rules, waveforms must have Internet protocol capability to make network-centric interoperability easier.

A DOD waveform portal will be established to help implement the new policy. The portal will provide information about the evaluation process, provide a current DOD communications waveforms list, and establish a database of DOD communications waveforms parameters.

The new policy does not apply to programs that use any wireless waveforms to support specialized missions, such as defense intelligence, counterintelligence, and aircraft and weapons system integration.

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • FCW PERSPECTIVES
    sensor network (agsandrew/Shutterstock.com)

    Are agencies really ready for EIS?

    The telecom contract has the potential to reinvent IT infrastructure, but finding the bandwidth to take full advantage could prove difficult.

  • People
    Dave Powner, GAO

    Dave Powner audits the state of federal IT

    The GAO director of information technology issues is leaving government after 16 years. On his way out the door, Dave Powner details how far govtech has come in the past two decades and flags the most critical issues he sees facing federal IT leaders.

  • FCW Illustration.  Original Images: Shutterstock, Airbnb

    Should federal contracting be more like Airbnb?

    Steve Kelman believes a lighter touch and a bit more trust could transform today's compliance culture.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.