Transition Watch: Obama's BlackBerry may be disconnected

Federal law, security concerns may compel president-elect to sign-off






President-elect Barack Obama is a devoted BlackBerry user, but that might have to change once he moves into the Oval Office, the New York Times reports.


 


The Presidential Records Act—which requires all correspondence from the president to become part of the public record and available for review—as well as security concerns about data stored on the devices or transmitted via radio frequencies may compel the president-elect to surrender his “CrackBerry”—a sobriquet the communications device has earned for its addictiveness.


 


There’s still a chance Obama could become the first emailing president, the  Times said, but that’s increasingly doubtful.


 

About the Author

Brian Robinson is a freelance writer based in Portland, Ore.

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