GSA to contractors: Drop a dime on crime

The General Services Administration’s Office of the Inspector General today launched an online form that contractors can use to submit evidence of possible criminal activities.

The office set up the Web site with a reporting form for contractors; the new Federal Acquisition Regulation rule that requires contractors to tell the government about such crimes takes effect Dec. 12.

The office centralized receiving those reports, and an online form is available on the IG's Integrity Report Web site. The form goes live Dec. 12.

When a contractor submits the electronic form, the GSA's system will reply automatically with an e-mail message that includes a tracking number and a copy of what was submitted so the contractor may forward it to an agency's contracting officer, according to the site.

“I encourage contractors to use our electronic form to submit reports required under the new FAR rule,” said Brian Miller, GSA’s IG, 

The new FAR rule creates self-reporting and ethics program requirements for federal contractors and subcontractors. The rule requires contractors to report to the IGs whenever they have credible evidence of a violation of the civil or criminal laws that cover fraud, conflicts of interest, bribery, or accepting gratuities.

About the Author

Matthew Weigelt is a freelance journalist who writes about acquisition and procurement.

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