Commission to fund research on China's cyberwarfare capabilities

A commission established by Congress to monitor issues important to the United States’ relationship with China is looking for a contractor to analyze the capabilities of the Chinese government and its affiliates to conduct cyberwarfare and exploit computer networks.

The U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission (USCC) issued a request for proposals Dec. 19 for a contract to produce a one-time unclassified report that would:

• Identify and assess major actors in China — state-affiliated and state-sponsored — who appear to be engaged in developing cyberwarfare capabilities.

• Explain how different organizations involved in those activities might be linked to one another.

• Assess the state of development of China's cyberwarfare doctrine.

• Provide a timeline of alleged Chinese-based hacking and intrusion into U.S. computer networks and those of U.S. allies.

• Analyze the vulnerabilities of U.S. government computer systems and civilian infrastructure and offer applicable policy recommendations.

USCC was created in October 2000 to investigate the national security implications of the trade and economic relationship between the United States and China and submit an annual report to Congress, with recommendations as appropriate. The leaders of the House and Senate appoint the commissioners.

The government will award the contract based on a combination of proposed costs, technical value and abilities, the RFP states. Submissions are due by Jan. 21, 2009.

About the Author

Ben Bain is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

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