John Gioia dies at 76

John Gioia, founder and former chairman, president and chief executive officer of Robbins-Gioia, died of cancer Dec. 26. He was 76 years old.

Gioia, a retired Air Force colonel, and Jack Robbins, a retired Air Force major general, founded the program management and contracting company in 1980. Gioia used his financial resources to start the company and mortgaged his home to cover early payroll costs.

He stepped down as president in 1997 and turned operations over to longtime employee Tony Baggiano.

Gioia retired as CEO in December 2002 and was replaced by Jim Leto. During Leto’s tenure, the company’s revenue grew to $100 million annually.

Gioia “was a spirited industry pioneer and a resolute business leader who built a firm of enduring value for this country,” said John Marselle, the firm's current CEO, in a statement issued Dec. 29. “His remarkable deeds and accomplishments have touched all of our lives. We are truly saddened by his loss and extend our heartfelt condolences to Patty Gioia and all the Gioia family.”

“The federal [information technology] community suffered a great loss with the passing of one of the most impactful leaders in the federal world of program management,” said Bob Guerra, a partner at Guerra Kiviat, a government contracting consulting firm.

Graveside services with full military honors will be held Jan. 26, 2009, at 11 a.m. at Arlington National Cemetery.

About the Author

David Hubler is the former print managing editor for GCN and senior editor for Washington Technology. He is freelance writer living in Annandale, Va.

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