Michael Lisagor's crystal ball for 2009

This is the fifth year I have looked into my crystal ball.

One would think that after so many years of accurate prognostications, the naysayers would run out of steam. But I soldier on:

  • Chinese government cyber warfare experts will penetrate a key Internal Revenue Service database — and will be flagged for an audit.
  • New political appointees will spend their first year getting up to speed, their second year changing high-level policy stuff, their third year realizing they were wrong, and a fourth year putting things back the way they were.
  • As federal workers retire, more management contractors will be hired to oversee development contractors, who will team with small-business subcontractors, who will rely on expert consultants to recommend other vendors, who will have hired retired federal workers with generous pay raises.
  • Upon being told that the Federal Emergency Management Agency has decided to make first-responder identification card standardization voluntary, many state and local governments will volunteer to ignore the initiative.
  • A new White House team will review programs for waste and inefficiency and will find a lot of both — like always.

About the Author

Michael Lisagor founded Celerity Works and is the author of "Winning and Managing Government Business."

Featured

  • FCW PERSPECTIVES
    sensor network (agsandrew/Shutterstock.com)

    Are agencies really ready for EIS?

    The telecom contract has the potential to reinvent IT infrastructure, but finding the bandwidth to take full advantage could prove difficult.

  • People
    Dave Powner, GAO

    Dave Powner audits the state of federal IT

    The GAO director of information technology issues is leaving government after 16 years. On his way out the door, Dave Powner details how far govtech has come in the past two decades and flags the most critical issues he sees facing federal IT leaders.

  • FCW Illustration.  Original Images: Shutterstock, Airbnb

    Should federal contracting be more like Airbnb?

    Steve Kelman believes a lighter touch and a bit more trust could transform today's compliance culture.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.