Bill would change security clearance process

House members have introduced legislation that would require reporting on governmentwide adjudication and investigation guidelines for the security clearance process and ways to evaluate how agencies accept each other’s clearances for employees and contractors.

The bill would require the president to submit a report to Congress that would include governmentwide adjudication guidelines, a plan to improve the professional development of security clearance adjudicators and methods to evaluate the effectiveness of interagency clearance reciprocity. The report would also include governmentwide standards for security clearance investigations and would be due in six months after the bill became law.

The proposed legislation was introduced Jan. 22 by Rep. Anna Eshoo (D-Calif.) and co-sponsored by Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.). Eshoo chairs the Permanent Select Intelligence Committee's Intelligence Community Management Subcommittee and Issa is the panel's ranking member.

The bill would also require the president to conduct an audit of the federal government’s security process every four years and submit those findings to Congress.

And a yearly report on the number of employees and contractors who hold security clearances and the clearances that were recently approved would be required. The report would also include data from intelligence agencies on the number of security clearances that have remained open for several increments of time; such as between four months and eight months. The report would have data on the percentage of reviews caused denying a clearance or that were inconclusive.

In addition, the legislation calls for the Office of Management and Budget to submit to Congress each year a report on security clearance determinations made during the previous fiscal year that had been pending for more than a year.

About the Author

Ben Bain is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • Contracting
    8 prototypes of the border walls as tweeted by CBP San Diego

    DHS contractors face protests – on the streets

    Tech companies are facing protests internally from workers and externally from activists about doing for government amid controversial policies like "zero tolerance" for illegal immigration.

  • Workforce
    By Mark Van Scyoc Royalty-free stock photo ID: 285175268

    At OPM, Weichert pushes direct hire, pay agent changes

    Margaret Weichert, now acting director of the Office of Personnel Management, is clearing agencies to make direct hires in IT, cyber and other tech fields and is changing pay for specialized occupations.

  • Cloud
    Shutterstock ID ID: 222190471 By wk1003mike

    IBM protests JEDI cloud deal

    As the deadline to submit bids on the Pentagon's $10 billion, 10-year warfighter cloud deal draws near, IBM announced a legal protest.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.