Importer data rule goes into effect

The Homeland Security Department has begun its new requirements for more information from importers and carriers on schedule despite the Obama administration’s request to review all last-minute regulations.

The White House on Jan. 20 asked agencies to consider postponing approval of any new regulations until new officials have had time to review them. Agencies also were advised to push back effective dates of new rules for two months, according to a memo from Rahm Emmanuel, the White House’s chief of staff.

However, the Importer Security Filing and Additional Carrier Requirements, also known as the “10+2” rule, went into effect as previously scheduled on Jan. 25. The rule requires importers to file 10 additional pieces of data and carriers to file two more forms before loading maritime cargo bound for the United States.

DHS submitted the interim final rule for publication in the Nov. 25, 2008 Federal Register to take effect in 60 days.

“The regulatory freeze will not delay 10+2,” the National Customs Brokers and Forwarders Association of America said in an announcement posted on its Web site today.

In previous comments on the rule, makers of computers, software and related devices said it could make the products more expensive and difficult to bring into the United States. In response, U.S. Customs and Border Protection established a six-month trial period to see how companies could supply the new information and allowed U.S. manufacturers to provide the most difficult data on a best-available basis.


About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

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