DHS approved 65 technologies under Safety Act

The Homeland Security Department's approvals of liability-protected technologies under a requirement from Congress dropped to 65 products and services in 2008 from 67 products and services in 2007.

Since 2004, DHS has certified and designated anti-terrorism products and services, including information technology, under the Support for Anti-Terrorism by Fostering Effective Technologies Act. The total number of awards stood at 240 as of Dec. 31, 2008, according to the DHS Web site.

Congress passed the law to encourage companies to produce innovative anti-terrorism technologies. Under the law, approved products and services would be protected from legal liability if they fail in connection with a terrorist attack.

Recent winners of certifications, the highest level of liability protection, are Science Applications International Corp. for its security system integration services and Andrews International Inc.’s suite of security services for shopping centers.

The number of certifications was three in 2004, 34 in 2005, 42 in 2006, 22 in 2007 and 24 in 2008.

Under the law, DHS also granted designations for products and services, and designations for testing and evaluation. There were 41 approvals in those categories in 2008, 45 in 2007, 18 in 2006 and 11 in 2005, the department said.


About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

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