What government data do you want to see?

Two open-government groups launched a Web site today that asks the public what government information it wants most to be made more available and electronically accessible. The findings will be submitted to Congress and the administration.

The “Show Us the Data: The Most Wanted Federal Government Documents” project asks people to nominate which information collected or created by the government they feel should be available electronically at no charge. People are asked to vote on the nominations. The project is being run by the Center for Democracy and Technology and OpenTheGovernment.org.

As of 4:16 p.m. on Feb. 11, reports by the Congressional Research Service were leading the balloting with 26 votes, followed by 15 votes for information on what companies did with money they received in government bailouts.

Patrice McDermott, director of OpenTheGovernment.org, said the groups planned to give the results of the voting to Congress and the administration. The voting will continue through March 9.

The groups said the initiative followed up on President Barack Obama's call for agencies to make information available to the public.

“The idea is to get information first available and findable … and then available in a way people can use to grab the data to do something with it,” said McDermott.

About the Author

Ben Bain is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • Contracting
    8 prototypes of the border walls as tweeted by CBP San Diego

    DHS contractors face protests – on the streets

    Tech companies are facing protests internally from workers and externally from activists about doing for government amid controversial policies like "zero tolerance" for illegal immigration.

  • Workforce
    By Mark Van Scyoc Royalty-free stock photo ID: 285175268

    At OPM, Weichert pushes direct hire, pay agent changes

    Margaret Weichert, now acting director of the Office of Personnel Management, is clearing agencies to make direct hires in IT, cyber and other tech fields and is changing pay for specialized occupations.

  • Cloud
    Shutterstock ID ID: 222190471 By wk1003mike

    IBM protests JEDI cloud deal

    As the deadline to submit bids on the Pentagon's $10 billion, 10-year warfighter cloud deal draws near, IBM announced a legal protest.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.