TWIC program has woes with PIN resets

 

The Transportation Security Administration is blaming a power outage last October for permanently damaging equipment used to reset personal identification numbers for thousands of holders of the Transportation Workers Identification Credential (TWIC).

Workers who received their TWIC cards before Oct. 21, 2008 who have forgotten their PINs must turn in their card and receive a replacement card, the TSA said in a statement posted on its Web site. The undated press release first appeared on the Web site in the last several days.

“The power outage that disrupted TWIC activations on Oct. 21, 2008 permanently damaged the equipment used to reset TWIC PINs,” TSA said. “As a result, if you were issued a TWIC prior to this date and forgot your PIN, you will be issued a replacement card free of charge.”

No personal data was lost or compromised, the agency said. Persons who received TWIC cards after Oct. 21, 2008, and who need to reset their PIN must bring their credential to an enrollment center. PIN resets are being prioritized based on compliance grouping, with workers approaching compliance dates receiving the highest priority, the agency said.

Under the TWIC program, 750,000 port workers must obtain the Federal Information Processing Standard 201-compliant biometric identification card by April for unescorted access to port facilities. Lockheed Martin Corp. is the prime contractor.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

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