Air Force plans relignment for centers

The Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center will move about 70 personnel during the next 18 months to support its cyber operations, the Air Force has announced.

Personnel from Kirtland Air Force Base, N.M., will be moved to Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center Detachments in California, Colorado and Florida, Air Force officials said Feb. 9.

“The organizational change will more effectively integrate command and control and cyber concerns with operational test and evaluation of command and control assets, space orbital vehicles, and space ground stations systems,” said Maj. Gen. Stephen Sargeant, the center’s commander.

Sargeant will remain in command of the realigned organization which tests and evaluates new weapons systems capabilities to provide information for decision makers during the acquisition process.

“Realigning AFOTEC's command and control and cyber expertise to our detachments is consistent with Air Force integration of cyber and space, and recognizes the mission critical role of software in the command and control of modern warfare,” Sargeant said.

The current realignment plan will move approximately 80 percent of the center's personnel to detachments at Edward Air Force Base, Calif.; Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.; and Peterson Air Force Base, Colo. The remaining 20 percent of personnel will be absorbed into the center’s headquarters at Kirtland.

The realignment affects eight civilian and 61 military employees, according to the Air Force.

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

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