ISIMC chooses candidates to co-chair subcommittees

The CIO Council’s new Information Security and Identity Management Committee (ISIMC) has chosen several candidates to co-chair subcommittees that will work to identify and recommend strategic IT security initiatives designed to strengthen agencies' data and network protection efforts.

ISIMC will provide advice to other federal committees to improve collaboration and reduce duplications in security and identity management-related areas, Vance Hitch, the Justice Department’s chief information officer said at Suss Consulting’s Federal Networks 2009 conference in McLean, Va. “We want to influence OMB and NIST” in their decision-making related to IT security and identity management, Hitch said.

Hitch and Robert Carey, the Navy's CIO, are co-chairmen of ISIMC. The committee, formed last fall, published its charter in December 2008. The charter states that ISIMC will look to improve areas such as logical access as specified in Homeland Security Presidential Directive 12, multifactor authentication, device authentication and quarantine, and the sharing of credentials and certificates among agencies.

The four subcommittees and co-chairs established to assist those efforts are:

Security Program Management

  • Kevin Deeley, Justice Department
  • Edward Roback, Treasury Department

Identity, Credential and Access Management

  • Paul Grant, Defense Department
  • Judith Spencer, General Services Administration

Network and Infrastructure Security

  • Brian Burns, Navy Department
  • Rob Martin, Justice Department

Security Acquisitions

  • Harry Feely, Education Department
  • Andrew Orndorff, Transportation Department

About the Author

Rutrell Yasin is is a freelance technology writer for GCN.

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