Army creates checklists for network tools

Army officials want to build an enterprise network that creates interoperability and integration across the entire Army infrastructure, according to an announcement published on FedBizOpps.gov.

The Army’s NETCOM/9th Signal Command developed compliance checklists for each of the capabilities required under the architecture. The checklists are available on FedBizOpps.gov so companies know what requirements their products must meet to comply with the Army LandWarNet NetOps Architecture, according to the announcement on Feb. 26.

The LandWarNet NetOps Architecture provides an enterprise-level blueprint of network-operations requirements, the announcement states.

“Achieving NetOps systems interoperability and integration across the Army Enterprise Infostructure is challenging due to the extraordinarily large and diverse organizations, and existing stovepipe tools and systems,” the announcement states.

The Army wants to standardize a scalable network operations toolset to help achieve that enterprisewide integration and addressing the acquisition process is one way the service expects to achieve its goal, according to the announcement. The Army will enforce compliance of the LandWarNet NetOps Architecture capabilities by using the acquisition process to ensure only interoperable components are purchased.

The NETCOM/9th Signal Command must ensure all network operations software and tools are compliant to the LandWarNet NetOps Architecture. Only compliant products will be fielded, according to the announcement.

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

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