GSA to announce Alliant awardees

The General Services Administration tomorrow will announce which companies have places on the $50 billion Alliant information technology contract, officials said today.

Officials have reevaluated the 62 bids for the 10-year governmentwide acquisition contract (GWAC) after U.S. Federal Claims Court Judge Francis Allegra threw out the agency’s initial awards a year ago. Allegra ruled that GSA had not adequately evaluated bids.

In July 2007, GSA had awarded 29 companies spots on Alliant, a multiple-award, indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity contract. GSA then added Stanley Associates in January 2008, after re-examining bids of the nine companies that protested the awards. After the judge’s ruling, Jim Williams, GSA’s Federal Acquisition Service commissioner, said GSA wouldn’t simply award places on the contract to all of the bidding companies.

Alliant and its sibling contract, Alliant Small Business, offer a centralized source to buy integrated IT products and services. The contracts are the successors to the ANSWER and Millennia GWACs. The Alliant contracts give agencies access to management and technical support services.

The Alliant Small Business contract was awarded in January to 72 firms. After the court's ruling on Alliant, GSA decided also to pull back its initial awards to 62 small companies on the Alliant Small Business contract and re-evaluate the more than 100 bids in the same way it was doing with Alliant.

About the Author

Matthew Weigelt is a freelance journalist who writes about acquisition and procurement.

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