DHS to consolidate software license buys

The Homeland Security Department will consolidate buying software licenses departmentwide, a move expected to save more than $280 million over six years, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said today.

Currently, DHS agencies purchase computer software and negotiate contracts independently – a practice Napolitano said “makes no sense.”

“By using strategic sourcing -- in other words, buying these licenses as one department -- we expect to save over $47 million per year, and $283 million over the next six years,” she said.

Napolitano announced the move as part of a larger program to cut costs, streamline decision-making and improve the department’s efficiency. She said the change in the way DHS purchases software licenses would happen within 60 days.

DHS also plans to stop printing all documents that can be sent electronically or posted online in the first 30 days of the program. Napolitano also said over the next 30 days DHS will eliminate noncritical travel for employees and use more conference calls and Web-based trainings and meetings.

The overall program includes efforts on managing assets, acquisitions and real property, as well as the hiring and credentialing of employees.

About the Author

Ben Bain is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

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