Obama picks leader for DHS directorate

President Barack Obama today said he intends to nominate Robert “Rand” Beers to lead the Homeland Security Department’s National Protection and Programs Directorate.

NPPD includes DHS’ Office of Cybersecurity and Communications, the Office of Infrastructure Protection and the U.S. Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology program. The Office of Cybersecurity and Communications includes the National Cybersecurity Division and its U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team.

According to the Obama administration's announcement, Beers has 35 years experience as a senior civil servant. In addition, he served as DHS' acting deputy secretary from Feb. 11 to April 3, and he led Obama’s review of DHS during the transition period.

The leader of NPPD is an undersecretary who comes after the department’s deputy secretary in order of succession after the DHS secretary, according to an executive order signed by former President George W. Bush in 2007. Robert Jamison held the NPPD leadership position during the final portion of the Bush administration.

In March, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano announced the appointment of Philip Reitinger as NPPD’s deputy undersecretary.

About the Author

Ben Bain is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

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