GSA signs agreement with Facebook

The General Services Administration has signed an agreement with Facebook that clears the way for federal agencies to use the social-networking Web site, a GSA official told Federal Computer Week today.

The official declined to provide details about the agreement but said it takes effect immediately.

Earlier negotiations with sites such as Flickr and YouTube resulted in special terms-of-service agreements for federal agencies. The agreements resolve the government’s issues with standard terms and conditions governing liability limits, endorsements, freedom of information and legal jurisdiction (read FCW's story here).

GSA has negotiated the agreements on behalf of all agencies because providers were reluctant to expend resources developing separate agreements with dozens or hundreds of agencies, GSA officials said. Agencies are already free to use Twitter because GSA found its standard terms of service compatible with federal use.

In February, Facebook announced that users can play a major role in developing the policies that govern the service. The site now lets users review, comment and vote on policy documents.

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

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