CBP updates trade data repository

U.S. Customs and Border Protection is modifying its Automated Commercial Environment trade data system to comply with new requirements for documents, the agency has announced.

Starting April 26, importers and exporters who file an e-manifest will receive a warning message if their identification documents for individuals transporting items across the border do not comply with the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative. Beginning June 1, the manifests will be rejected if they lack compliant documentation, CBP officials said.

Under the travel initiative, the government will accept only specific identity documents at the land and sea borders, including U.S. passports and U.S. passport cards, starting June 1. In past years, travelers were allowed to cross freely with documents such as birth certificates and driver's licenses.

“As of June 1, 2009, the warning message will be replaced by a rejection of the e-manifest,” according to an agency announcement issued April 6.

Also, the environment’s Web portal now provides a national repository of data for a broader view of trade activities, the agency said.

Electronic access should facilitate information sharing among border ports and support efforts for a nationwide approach to managing compliance with trade laws and regulations, CPB officials said.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

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