Workshop to explore social-media privacy

 The Homeland Security Department’s privacy office will hold a conference to explore the use of social media as if affects security and privacy. The “Government 2.0: Privacy and Best Practices” conference will be held June 22 to June 23 in Washington and is open to the public.

The workshop is meant to help agencies use Web 2.0 technologies in ways to protect privacy and security, and to explore the best practices for implementing President Barack Obama’s memo on open government that was released in January, according to a notice published in the federal register April 17.

Panelists will discuss topics such as transparency and participation in government, privacy and legal concerns brought by the government’s use of social media, and how the government can best use the technologies while protecting privacy rights during the conference, DHS officials said.

DHS is asking for comments by June 1 on topics such as:

  • How the government is using social media.
  • The risks, benefits and operational concerns that come from government use of the technologies.
  • Privacy, security and legal issues raised by the government's use of social media.
  • Recommendations on best practices for government use of the technologies.

About the Author

Ben Bain is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

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