DISA seeks input on the GIG's architecture

The Defense Information Systems Agency wants input from industry to help formulate an acquisition strategy to develop the Global Information Grid’s wide network management architecture, according to a request for information.

DISA wants to define a framework for obtaining situational awareness and common operational picture across the GIG, according to the RFI announced April 27. The information request project is named the Network Management across Network Boundary.

DISA also wants to create a way to provide input to the GIG Technical Guidance and the GIG Enterprise Service Profile.

Only small businesses should respond to the request to help the agency formulate an acquisition strategy that considers small businesses’ abilities to act as prime contractors or as subcontractors, according to the announcement.

Providers should have familiarity with the network-management approaches and technology used in the large-scale fixed networks operated by DISA and the military services, according to the request.

The respondents should also be familiar with major tactical programs such as Army Warfighter Information Network-Tactical, Navy Automated Digital Network System, and Transformational Communications Satellite. Interested vendors should submit statements of their knowledge and capabilities in reports that do not exceed six pages.

“This task is not about developing software that will support GIG NetOps situational awareness but rather defining the requirements and necessary information exchange content and formats,” the information request states.

Responses are due by May 1.

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

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