Navy seeks info on NGEN project

The Navy wants information from industry about the development of the Next Generation Enterprise Network (NGEN) that will replace the Navy/Marine Crops Intranet, according to an announcement on the Federal Business Opportunities Web site today.

The service wants industry to provide comments and offer technical solutions to the Independent Security Operations Oversight and Assessment (SOO&A), a technique used to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of a project’s information technology components, the Navy said.

An independent SOO&A is used to assess the probability that a proposed IT component will address all the factors needed for successful project management, development and implementation.

The assessment ensures the technology will meet the stated project requirements, be cost effective and provide an industry-accepted approach to information security, the Navy said.

Responses to the information request should consider the estimated skill sets and staffing levels needed to support a network with more than 370,000 seats and 700,000 users, the service said.

Responses also should provide insight into what technical and developmental information, equipment, and tools may be required. They are due May 27.

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

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