Audit: CBP still has problems with IT controls

Auditors find little progress in CBP's IT security

The Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agency made little progress in securing its information technology systems in fiscal 2008, according to a new audit released by Homeland Security Department Inspector General Richard Skinner.

The agency, which is part of DHS, had significant problems with IT controls, according to the audit conducted by KPMG and released by Skinner May 8. Auditors found 34 weaknesses in IT controls at CBP in fiscal 2008, including 17 repeat findings.

The year before, in fiscal 2007, auditors identified 36 IT-related weaknesses, of which 19 were corrected and 17 continued to be deficient by the time of the fiscal 2008 audit.

The agency improved how it tracks the hiring, termination and systems access of contracted employees in its Office of Information Technology, the auditors wrote. CBP also improved how it tracks backup tapes and handles management reviews of control overrides.

However, the auditors said, "Collectively, the IT control weaknesses limited CBP’s ability to ensure that critical financial and operational data were maintained in such a manner to ensure confidentiality, integrity and availability. In addition, these weaknesses negatively impacted the internal controls over CBP financial reporting and its operation, and we consider them to collectively represent a significant deficiency for CBP under standards established by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.”

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • Defense
    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) reveal concept renderings for the Next NGA West (N2W) campus from the design-build team McCarthy HITT winning proposal. The entirety of the campus is anticipated to be operational in 2025.

    How NGA is tackling interoperability challenges

    Mark Munsell, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency’s CTO, talks about talent shortages and how the agency is working to get more unclassified data.

  • Veterans Affairs
    Veterans Affairs CIO Jim Gfrerer speaks at an Oct. 10 FCW event (Photo credit: Troy K. Schneider)

    VA's pivot to agile

    With 10 months on the job, Veterans Affairs CIO Jim Gfrerer is pushing his organization toward a culture of constant delivery.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.