House passes technology R&D bill

Legislation would also involve industry and academia

The House has passed a bill designed to strengthen interagency planning, coordination, and prioritization for information technology research and development.

The Networking and Information Technology Research and Development Act of 2009 (H.R. 2020) would require that the government develop and periodically update a strategic plan with input from industry and academia, said Rep. Bart Gordon (D-Tenn.), chairman of the Science and Technology Committee and the bill’s author.

The measure, which lawmakers passed by a voice vote May 12, seeks to create a vision for networking and IT research and development across the federal government, and define the metrics for gauging progress toward that vision, Gordon said.

“To ensure that we make the most effective use of our resources and to remain a leader in these fields, it is critical that the agencies…come together to develop common goals and well-defined strategies,” he said.

The legislation also calls for increased support of interdisciplinary research in networking and IT that would help deal with national challenges.

“These large-scale, long-term investments can provide substantial benefits to society, such as improving the effectiveness and efficiency of our health care and energy delivery systems,” Gordon said.

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

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