White House needs phone, data lines for trips

The White House needs temporary communication services when the president and his staff travel, and officials are seeking information from industry sources on how to provide them, according to an announcement on the Federal Business Opportunities Web site.

The White House Communications Agency needs to provide the president, vice president, first lady, staff members and the Secret Service with temporary access to voice, data and videoconferencing services at sites they are visiting, the announcement states.

Contractors’ solutions must be able to support about 20 sites simultaneously for as long as 30 days at a time, with 100 to 200 installed lines per site. The communications office wants business lines, radio lines, DSL, ISDN and T1 services, according to the May 13 announcement.

Most orders for communication services must be installed and working on short notice, usually in 12 hours, the announcement states.

Each trip site will require the vendor to have a team capable of managing the installation, activation, and deactivation of the temporary phone and data lines. Local, long-distance and international dialing capabilities are required.

Responses are due by May 26.

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

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