Obama budget has $148B for research

Energy, biomedical and health R&D included

President Barack Obama’s proposed fiscal 2010 budget would spend $148 billion for scientific research and development across all federal agencies, his top science adviser told the House Science and Technology Committee.

That represents an increase of $555 million, or 0.4 percent, over the 2009 enacted amount, John Holdren, director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, told the committee May 14.

That figure does not include the $21.5 billion for research funding in the recent economic stimulus law.

The Obama administration aims to increase R&D spending to 3 percent of the national gross domestic product, up from 2.6 percent currently.

Research priorities for fiscal 2010 are basic science at the National Science Foundation, National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the Energy Department's Office of Science; clean energy, biomedical, health, safety and security, Holdren said.

At a hearing, Holdren discussed plans for an independent review of U.S. human space flight activities conducted by a panel of experts led by Norman Augustine, former chief executive of Lockheed Martin Corp.

The science panel has been promoting legislation to increase research and development. On May 12, the House passed H.R. 2020, the Networking and Information Technology Research and Development Act of 2009, by a voice vote. The bill seeks to strengthen interagency planning and coordination for R&D across the federal government, including large-scale interdisciplinary research.

H.R. 2020 would also promote partnerships between the federal government, academia and industry to foster technology transfer, and creates a task force for cybersecurity R&D.

The legislation was endorsed by IBM, the Association for Computing Machinery, the Computing Research Association, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

The Fed 100

Save the date for 28th annual Federal 100 Awards Gala.

Featured

  • Social network, census

    5 predictions for federal IT in 2017

    As the Trump team takes control, here's what the tech community can expect.

  • Rep. Gerald Connolly

    Connolly warns on workforce changes

    The ranking member of the House Oversight Committee's Government Operations panel warns that Congress will look to legislate changes to the federal workforce.

  • President Donald J. Trump delivers his inaugural address

    How will Trump lead on tech?

    The businessman turned reality star turned U.S. president clearly has mastered Twitter, but what will his administration mean for broader technology issues?

  • Login.gov moving ahead

    The bid to establish a single login for accessing government services is moving again on the last full day of the Obama presidency.

  • Shutterstock image (by Jirsak): customer care, relationship management, and leadership concept.

    Obama wraps up security clearance reforms

    In a last-minute executive order, President Obama institutes structural reforms to the security clearance process designed to create a more unified system across government agencies.

  • Shutterstock image: breached lock.

    What cyber can learn from counterterrorism

    The U.S. has to look at its experience in developing post-9/11 counterterrorism policies to inform efforts to formalize cybersecurity policies, says a senior official.

Reader comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group