Obama budget has $148B for research

Energy, biomedical and health R&D included

President Barack Obama’s proposed fiscal 2010 budget would spend $148 billion for scientific research and development across all federal agencies, his top science adviser told the House Science and Technology Committee.

That represents an increase of $555 million, or 0.4 percent, over the 2009 enacted amount, John Holdren, director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, told the committee May 14.

That figure does not include the $21.5 billion for research funding in the recent economic stimulus law.

The Obama administration aims to increase R&D spending to 3 percent of the national gross domestic product, up from 2.6 percent currently.

Research priorities for fiscal 2010 are basic science at the National Science Foundation, National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the Energy Department's Office of Science; clean energy, biomedical, health, safety and security, Holdren said.

At a hearing, Holdren discussed plans for an independent review of U.S. human space flight activities conducted by a panel of experts led by Norman Augustine, former chief executive of Lockheed Martin Corp.

The science panel has been promoting legislation to increase research and development. On May 12, the House passed H.R. 2020, the Networking and Information Technology Research and Development Act of 2009, by a voice vote. The bill seeks to strengthen interagency planning and coordination for R&D across the federal government, including large-scale interdisciplinary research.

H.R. 2020 would also promote partnerships between the federal government, academia and industry to foster technology transfer, and creates a task force for cybersecurity R&D.

The legislation was endorsed by IBM, the Association for Computing Machinery, the Computing Research Association, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.