IG: Interior fails to track computers

Hundreds of the department's computers can't be located

The Interior Department can’t account for hundreds of its personal computers and laptops, according to a newly posted report.

The department's inspector general found 13 computers missing and, more importantly, nearly 20 percent of more than 2,500 computers could not be specifically located. Compounding the lack of accountability, Interior doesn’t have encryption requirements, leaving the department's sensitive information vulnerable, the report from April  24 states.

The IG recommended that Interior set departmentwide policies for tracking which employees have computers and where the computers are. Currently, each bureau there has its own rules, the IG said.

“This lack of accountability stems from the department not requiring that computers be treated as sensitive property,” the IG wrote.

The IG also recommended:

  • Encrypting all of the department’s portable computers.
  • Requiring that employees report lost computers to the department’s Computer Incident Response Center.
  • Erasing information properly from computers before disposal.

About the Author

Matthew Weigelt is a freelance journalist who writes about acquisition and procurement.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.