DISA seeks on-demand communications

Agency wants a utility model that can adjust to varying demands

The Defense Information Systems Agency is seeking on-demand communications services that can easily be increased and decreased as demand varies, according to an announcement today on the Federal Business Opportunities Web site.

The request for information said the new communications services must be, “reliable, responsive and cost-effective.”

DISA wants scalable communications capabilities that use an on-demand service approach and new equipment such as routers, switches and firewalls should adjust to changes in communications requirements, according to the announcement.

The services must be capable of working with DISA's existing information technology and security systems and not hurt DISA's server equipment, storage systems and networks.

The new system should have a noticeable positive effect on communications network performance and vendors must provide technical expertise and support, according to the agency. Also, the agency said the services must include the ability to offer other network-based services over its classified and unclassified networks.

Responses to the request are due June 18.

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

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