DOD: Can virtualization make security more manageable?

Officials interested in the security benefits offered by virtual network components

Defense Department officials want to know if virtualization technology can make DOD’s networks more secure and easier to manage, according to an information request posted on the Federal Business Opportunities Web site.

Virtualization could make it easier to provision network components and make it possible to isolate risky activities such as browsing Web sites or opening e-mail messages from unknown senders, according to the request posted July 10. Virtualization technology makes it possible to run multiple network components on a single server.

Modern operating systems and many applications in traditional data rooms may be too large to secure effectively, according to DOD.

“It may be that the era of monolithic general-purpose operating systems is nearing its end and could be replaced by a cluster of modules or virtual appliances acting in concert to perform services traditionally supplied by operating systems,” the request states.

DOD officials are also interested in using virtualization to create trusted enclaves of servers to handle sensitive information and operations. The enclaves would be independent of other systems and could be refreshed if security is compromised.

Virtualization may also make it possible to imitate a private-sector program that gives employees a subsidy to buy laptop computers. Employees use the laptops to connect to corporate networks, but virtualization protects networks from any security risks possibly residing on the portable computers, according to DOD.

Responses are due July 20.

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • Defense
    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) reveal concept renderings for the Next NGA West (N2W) campus from the design-build team McCarthy HITT winning proposal. The entirety of the campus is anticipated to be operational in 2025.

    How NGA is tackling interoperability challenges

    Mark Munsell, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency’s CTO, talks about talent shortages and how the agency is working to get more unclassified data.

  • Veterans Affairs
    Veterans Affairs CIO Jim Gfrerer speaks at an Oct. 10 FCW event (Photo credit: Troy K. Schneider)

    VA's pivot to agile

    With 10 months on the job, Veterans Affairs CIO Jim Gfrerer is pushing his organization toward a culture of constant delivery.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.