Come join the homeland security review

New Web site lets partners, stakeholders, public share opinions on DHS, homeland security

Starting today people can use a online tool to contribute to an extensive, ongoing review of the Homeland Security Department that will help determine DHS’ focus in the future.

DHS plans to hold three online dialogues in coming months so people other than those directly responsible for the Quadrennial Homeland Security Review (QHSR) can participate in that examination of homeland security-related goals, objectives and policies. Congress mandated the wide-ranging QHSR in 2007, and a final report on the effort is due to lawmakers by December 31.

The National Academy of Public Administration will host all the sessions, with the first running today through August 9. People can view and comment on proposals made by study groups that are conducting the QHSR, suggest their own ideas, tag ideas, and rate proposals by other people.

The quadrennial study is looking at:

  • Counterterrorism and domestic security management, including cybersecurity.
  • Border security.
  • Immigration law enforcement.
  • Disaster response.
  • Preparing for, responding to, and recovering from disasters
  • Developing a homeland security national risk assessment.
  • Assessing current approaches to national homeland security planning and the development of capabilities.

The second Web-based dialogue, scheduled to run from August 31 through September 6, will let people comment on additional material from the study groups. The third dialogue, set for September 28 through October 4, will seek final review of the study groups’ recommendations for mission goals, objectives, and enhancements.

Each session will build on the previous one, with the QHSR study groups incorporating the input received online into their review, according to the National Dialogue on the Quadrennial Homeland Security Review’s Web page.

About the Author

Ben Bain is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

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