FCC wants help on universal broadband

Agency must submit a national broadband plan to Congress

Federal Chief Information Officer Vivek Kundra will participate in the first Federal Communications Commission (FCC) workshop on developing a national plan for universal broadband Internet access, FCC officials announced today.

Beth Noveck, the deputy chief technology officer for open government, is also scheduled to speak at the Aug. 6 workshop, according to the FCC. Noveck will discuss new opportunities for governments to engage people through broadband and emerging technologies, including through the use of collaboration platforms, according to the FCC.

The economic stimulus law requires the FCC to submit a national broadband plan to Congress by Feb. 16, 2010, the FCC noted. The plan must ensure that all people in the United States have access to broadband Internet and establish benchmarks for meeting that goal.

The workshop is the first in a series of planned public meetings, FCC officials said. The workshops are open to the public at the FCC’s headquarters building and online. The public may register to participate in the workshop at www.broadband.gov/ws_egov.html.



About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

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