FCC wants help on universal broadband

Agency must submit a national broadband plan to Congress

Federal Chief Information Officer Vivek Kundra will participate in the first Federal Communications Commission (FCC) workshop on developing a national plan for universal broadband Internet access, FCC officials announced today.

Beth Noveck, the deputy chief technology officer for open government, is also scheduled to speak at the Aug. 6 workshop, according to the FCC. Noveck will discuss new opportunities for governments to engage people through broadband and emerging technologies, including through the use of collaboration platforms, according to the FCC.

The economic stimulus law requires the FCC to submit a national broadband plan to Congress by Feb. 16, 2010, the FCC noted. The plan must ensure that all people in the United States have access to broadband Internet and establish benchmarks for meeting that goal.

The workshop is the first in a series of planned public meetings, FCC officials said. The workshops are open to the public at the FCC’s headquarters building and online. The public may register to participate in the workshop at www.broadband.gov/ws_egov.html.



About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.