DISA, GSA detail $5 billion satellite pact

A new satellite contract that the General Services Administration (GSA) and the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) are entering into will offer a $5 billion, 10-year multiple award schedule and indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity terms.

The agencies announced in late July that they had agreed to combine their acquisition efforts. They held an industry day and a conference call today to offer more details.

The new contract, which GSA expects to award, beginning in the second quarter of 2011, will effectively consolidate multiple other existing satellite services contracts, which are close to their expiration dates.

DISA Director Lt. Gen. Carroll Pollett and GSA’s Federal Acquisition Service Commissioner James Williams signed a memorandum of agreement July 28 to combine the acquisition efforts.

The unified effort will inherently save agencies money, DISA and GSA representatives said, because agencies won’t have to spend time and money shopping for satellite services, and by combining buying power, the price will be lower than what agencies are currently paying.
 
“Why manage separate contract vehicles that offer essentially the same services when we can combine forces?” said Tony Montemarano, DISA’s component acquisition executive.

The federal government increasingly relies on commercial satellite communications to provide essential, secure communications to people working outside of offices, such as disaster recovery teams and combat troops. Satellite services also support distance learning and remote access to global government networks.

About the Author

Sami Lais is a special contributor to Washington Technology.

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