Microsoft formally appeals Word patent ruling

Microsoft has formally appealed a judgment issued last week that would require the company to stop selling Microsoft Word within the U.S.


 Related stories:

Microsoft gets little sympathy from federal (non)fan base
Federal future cloudy for Microsoft Word
Court ruling puts brakes on sales of Microsoft Word


The judgment came after a jury trial that found aspects of Microsoft Word violate the patent of the Canadian software firm i4i as it relates to what's being called "custom XML."

In the ruling, U.S. District Judge Leonard Davis of the Eastern District of Texas ordered Microsoft to stop selling versions of Word "that have the capability of opening a .XML, .DOCX, or .DOCM file ('an XML file') containing custom XML" within 60 days. He also ordered Microsoft to pay i4i $240 million in damages, $40 million of which was granted because the jury found the patent violation to be "willful."

Late last week, Microsoft filed for an emergency stay with the district court. In its filing Tuesday with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, Microsoft has also asked for an emergency stay while the appeal is being heard.

According to the case docket, the first oral arguments in the appeal will be held Sept. 23.

About the Author

Becky Nagel is the executive editor of the 1105 Redmond Media Group's Web sites, including Redmondmag.com, RCPmag.com, RedDevNews.com and VisualStudioMagazine.com, among others.

Featured

  • Contracting
    8 prototypes of the border walls as tweeted by CBP San Diego

    DHS contractors face protests – on the streets

    Tech companies are facing protests internally from workers and externally from activists about doing for government amid controversial policies like "zero tolerance" for illegal immigration.

  • Workforce
    By Mark Van Scyoc Royalty-free stock photo ID: 285175268

    At OPM, Weichert pushes direct hire, pay agent changes

    Margaret Weichert, now acting director of the Office of Personnel Management, is clearing agencies to make direct hires in IT, cyber and other tech fields and is changing pay for specialized occupations.

  • Cloud
    Shutterstock ID ID: 222190471 By wk1003mike

    IBM protests JEDI cloud deal

    As the deadline to submit bids on the Pentagon's $10 billion, 10-year warfighter cloud deal draws near, IBM announced a legal protest.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.