Joint Chiefs chairman takes questions on YouTube

Service members, civilians can ask questions via video recordings

Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, launched a new YouTube channel where service members and civilians can ask him questions, according to Defense Department officials.

The questions can be about any topic, according to a DOD article about the new video channel.

“The chairman really wants to have a conversation with the troops akin to the way he does all-hands calls at bases all over the world,” Navy Capt. John Kirby, Mullen’s public affairs officer, said in the article. "He wanted that conversation to be as interactive as possible and reflective of what is on their minds.”

Mullen plans to use social media to expand the way he interacts with service members and the public, according to DOD officials. The channel was launched Aug. 19. Questions should be submitted in video form at www.youtube.com/dodvclips.

The deadline to submit videos is Aug. 31. Mullen will answer selected video questions after Sept. 1 through a video podcast posted on YouTube and an interview that will air on the Pentagon Channel, according to DOD.

Mullen’s YouTube channel is similar to a new forum started by Defense Secretary Robert Gates on the new DOD homepage.

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

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