DISA’s view from the cloud

Sienkiewicz explains why DISA set up an internal cloud-computing service and what it means for operations

The Defense Information Systems Agency is one of the first government organizations to commit to building an internal cloud. It has been running pilot programs for as many 1,000 users, and it recently announced its Rapid Access Computing Environment, which will enable the agency to deliver cloud-based computing services to developers and testers within 24 hours of a request. Those users will be able to provision cloud services in a production environment beginning Oct. 1.

Henry Sienkiewicz, technical adviser at DISA’s Computing Services Directorate, explains why the agency set up the new service and what it means for operations.

FCW: Why did DISA decide to adopt cloud computing?

Sienkiewicz: [DISA is] a provider of information services to [the Defense Department] community, [and cloud computing] will allow us the flexibility to rapidly scale up and down the delivery of those services. Through standardization, we’ll also be able to use a much more managed approach that will help us reduce costs.

FCW: Did you have any concerns about moving to the cloud?

Sienkiewicz: Traditionally, our developers have had their own boxes by their side, so there was the change in culture to consider. Also, we as an agency have to assist the rest of the [DOD] community through the use of standards, so we have to make sure that services are created that use only the best coding practices. And then there was the cost involved in all of this, as DISA does not get appropriated funds.

FCW: How does cloud computing affect the data center?

Sienkiewicz: The user-centric focus of cloud computing is forcing that change in the role of the data center. We as an institution have been good at throwing hardware and resources at things, but the ebb and flow of the cloud is a lot different for us both as providers and as users. It makes us think through data center problems in a different way.

About the Author

Brian Robinson is a freelance writer based in Portland, Ore.

The Fed 100

Save the date for 28th annual Federal 100 Awards Gala.

Featured

  • computer network

    How Einstein changes the way government does business

    The Department of Commerce is revising its confidentiality agreement for statistical data survey respondents to reflect the fact that the Department of Homeland Security could see some of that data if it is captured by the Einstein system.

  • Defense Secretary Jim Mattis. Army photo by Monica King. Jan. 26, 2017.

    Mattis mulls consolidation in IT, cyber

    In a Feb. 17 memo, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told senior leadership to establish teams to look for duplication across the armed services in business operations, including in IT and cybersecurity.

  • Image from Shutterstock.com

    DHS vague on rules for election aid, say states

    State election officials had more questions than answers after a Department of Homeland Security presentation on the designation of election systems as critical U.S. infrastructure.

  • Org Chart Stock Art - Shutterstock

    How the hiring freeze targets millennials

    The government desperately needs younger talent to replace an aging workforce, and experts say that a freeze on hiring doesn't help.

  • Shutterstock image: healthcare digital interface.

    VA moves ahead with homegrown scheduling IT

    The Department of Veterans Affairs will test an internally developed scheduling module at primary care sites nationwide to see if it's ready to service the entire agency.

  • Shutterstock images (honglouwawa & 0beron): Bitcoin image overlay replaced with a dollar sign on a hardware circuit.

    MGT Act poised for a comeback

    After missing in the last Congress, drafters of a bill to encourage cloud adoption are looking for a new plan.

Reader comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group