Software development smorgasbord

There are several variations when it comes to alternative software development approaches. Here are definitions of some of them and other key concepts.

Agile development: In this alternative to traditional software development, programmers and end users work together to create software through a series of short iterations often called sprints. Constant feedback between the groups quickly addresses coding errors and changes in user requirements.

Lean software development: Borrowing ideas from lean manufacturing disciplines, this relative of agile development seeks to reduce wasted effort in development projects, such as those associated with excessive administrative overhead and costly commitments to software features that would be nice to have but are not essential.

Scrum: One of the most widely adopted agile variations, it taps ScrumMasters to keep teams of programmers and end users focused on creating and testing the software iterations that go into creating the new application.

Spiral development: This methodology uses an evolutionary series of iterations that each result in the creation of reduced-scale prototypes that approximate the desired end-state product. The design stage for each iteration involves a fresh opportunity for risk assessment and program changes.

Waterfall: A traditional programming method that breaks the development process into discrete steps, such as requirements definition, design and implementation. Each step must be completed before engineers move to the next one. It’s increasingly being seen as risky for software development because it doesn’t easily accommodate changing user requirements and might not uncover coding errors until late in the process.

Extreme programming: A distinguishing feature of this agile development variation is pair programming, in which two software developers share coding and over-the-shoulder evaluation duties at one workstation.

About the Author

Alan Joch is a freelance writer based in New Hampshire.

The Fed 100

Read the profiles of all this year's winners.

Featured

  • Shutterstock image (by wk1003mike): cloud system fracture.

    Does the IRS have a cloud strategy?

    Congress and watchdog agencies have dinged the IRS for lacking an enterprise cloud strategy seven years after it became the official policy of the U.S. government.

  • Shutterstock image: illuminated connections between devices.

    Who won what in EIS

    The General Services Administration posted detailed data on how the $50 billion Enterprise Infrastructure Solutions contract might be divvied up.

  • Wikimedia Image: U.S. Cyber Command logo.

    Trump elevates CyberCom to combatant command status

    The White House announced a long-planned move to elevate Cyber Command to the status of a full combatant command.

  • Photo credit: John Roman Images / Shutterstock.com

    Verizon plans FirstNet rival

    Verizon says it will carve a dedicated network out of its extensive national 4G LTE network for first responders, in competition with FirstNet.

  • AI concept art

    Can AI tools replace feds?

    The Heritage Foundation is recommending that hundreds of thousands of federal jobs be replaced by automation as part of a larger government reorganization strategy.

  • DOD Common Access Cards

    DOD pushes toward CAC replacement

    Defense officials hope the Common Access Card's days are numbered as they continue to test new identity management solutions.

Reader comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group