Secret Service plans IT reboot

Agency plans for a multi-phased IT modernization effort

The Secret Service wants information from industry as it prepares to overhaul its information technology infrastructure.

The service wants to put in place a hierarchical IT infrastructure with integrated cybersecurity tools and scalable database architecture, according to a new request for information (RFI). The upgrade is part of the service’s Information Integration and Transformation (IIT) program designed to improve the service’s IT, the notice published Oct. 16 on the Federal Business Opportunities Web site said.

According to the RFI, the service’s existing IT infrastructure is outdated and at risk of failing. Forty-two mission-oriented applications run on a 1980s IBM mainframe with a 68 percent performance reliability rating, it said. In addition, data systems and IT security don’t meet requirements, the service said.

The service plans to do the overhaul in increments. The first will be focused on modernizing IT infrastructure, database architecture and maintenance, and cybersecurity projects, the service said.

The first increment will provide a foundation for the remaining IIT phases that will focus on voice and data communication interoperability gaps, access controls, and protective and investigative intelligence operations, according to the RFI.

The service asked interested companies to submit technical concept papers and a notice of intent by Oct. 30. The service said it plans to hire one prime contractor to characterize its current IT infrastructure, refine requirements, design, develop, integrate, test, deploy, and sustain an integrated IT solution.

According to the RFI, a request for proposal for the first part of the program – including schedule and cost information – is expected to be released by mid-January.

A measure recently approved by a House-Senate conference committee to fund the Homeland Security Department, of which the service is a part, would give the service $33.96 million for IT modernization. The House approved that legislation on Oct. 15, but the Senate is yet to consider the measure.


About the Author

Ben Bain is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

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